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Yellowstone Wolf Field Courses

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Winter Wolf Discovery

observations & accommodations packages

Educational Adventures

personalized accompaniment

Yellowstone Association Field Courses

field courses taught by experts

Wildlands Studies   San Francisco State credit

Collegiate Courses Visiting Yellowstone Curriculum and Instruction provided by Nathan Varley

 

Want to know what a Yellowstone wolf watching experience in these courses would be like?  Read what other student participants and journalists have written:
bullet

Life Gives Life  by Christine Baleshta

bullet

The Unwatched Watchers by Kristin Kenlan

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Winter Wolf Discovery: Program couples naturalist with tourists  by Jeff Tollefson

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Born to be Wild  by Susanne Hulsmeyer

bulletYellowstone Winter Programs by Sharon Lloyd Spence

 

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Instructional course for collegiate students visiting Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone:   Issues For Study  is a curriculum provided by Nathan Varley

 

 

The Yellowstone Association Institute is pleased to offer Winter Wolf Discovery educational programs in cooperation with Yellowstone National Park Lodges.  Participants on the Winter Wolf Discovery program enjoy the best of both worlds. During the day, they explore the park, looking for wolves with Nathan Varley, a knowledgeable naturalist from the Institute and creator of Yellowstone Wolf Tracker. Each night, they return to excellent meals, comfortable accommodations, and entertaining evening programs at the Mammoth Hot Springs hotel.

Three-day packages (Wed night to Fri afternoon and Fri night to Sun afternoon) January through March 4 2001, and include:  

bulletInstruction by Institute wildlife biologist Nathan Varley
bullet2 nights lodging with private bath at Mammoth Hot Springs
bullet2 breakfasts and lunches per person
bulletSnowshoe rentals
bulletHot tub rental, skating, and welcome gift
bulletEvening programs by the National Park Service
bulletVan transportation to park attractions and lodging
bullet"Snowcard" for discounts on additional meals, gifts, activities
bulletFor details, visit the Yellowstone Association's Winter Wolf Discovery and Yellowstone National Park Lodge's web sites.  For information and reservations, call (307) 344-5566.

Reservations (307) 344-5566

 

 

 

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Educational Adventures are personal natural history tours for families and other small groups.   An experienced Institute naturalist will meet you at a predetermined location and join you in your vehicle for a private introduction to park wildlife and ecology.

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Arrangements

 

Yellowstone Association Institute Field Courses

Making arrangements for any Yellowstone Association Institute program can be done by contacting the registrar at the address below.  Reservations will be confirmed in writing.  All participants are required to sign a Release and Assumption of Risk form.

Yellowstone Association Institute

P.O. Box 117  Yellowstone National Park  Wyoming 82190

Phone: (307) 344-2294     Fax: (307) 344-2485    

email:  astrattman@yellowstoneassociation.org

Wildlife Watching in Grizzly Country LODGING

May 7-9 (#502) Limit: 13

Location: Mammoth Hot Springs

Instructor: Gene Ball

$180 (Member’s fee $170)

Spring is a superb time for viewing wildlife in Yellowstone. Field observation will be the major goal and activity of this introduction to the park's many wildlife species. Methods of unobtrusive observation and the ethics of interaction with wildlife will be central themes. The flexible schedule of daily field trips allows for discussions on various wildlife topics, issues, and controversies. The opening session will focus on tips for the best use of scopes and binoculars. Be prepared for occasional moderate hikes at higher elevations.

We will meet in the Mammoth Hot Springs area at 10:00 am on the first day and end with an optional evening outing on the last day. Rooms have been set aside at Mammoth - contact registrar for reservation information.

 

Spring Wildlife on the Northern Range LODGING

May 9-11 (#503) Limit: 13

May 12-14 (#505) Limit: 13

Location: Mammoth Hot Springs

Instructor: Jim Garry, M.S.

$180 (Member’s fee $170)

Winter departs slowly from Yellowstone, but with spring comes new life and a wildlife show second to none. There are wolf pups in dens and bear mothers with new young in tow. Red bison calves frolic in the herd and the elk come to term. Small hibernators scamper about and birds return from the south. We will spend time viewing and learning about the wildlife on Yellowstone's Northern Range, including one of the world's great wildlife viewing areas, the Lamar Valley, where we may see elk, bison, coyotes, bears, and wolves. Bring your binoculars and be prepared for short hikes in easy terrain.

We will meet in the Mammoth Hot Springs area at 9:00 am on the first day and end late afternoon on the last day. Rooms have been set aside at Mammoth - contact registrar for reservation information.

Spring Wildlife on the Northern Range LODGING

May 12-14 (#505)

(see description above)

 

Wolf Watching in Yellowstone

May 19-21 (#508) Limit: 12

Location: Lamar Buffalo Ranch

Instructor: Norman A. Bishop

$180 (Member’s fee $170)

Yellowstone National Park may be the best place in the world to watch wolves. Bring your binoculars, warm clothing for freezing mornings, and join the fun. We'll consider the scientific and social reasons why some Americans have alternately reviled and revered wolves. We'll also think through the process of justifying their restoration as an experimental population under the Endangered Species Act. Find out what the wolves eat, how they kill their prey, which does the killing, and what effect wolves have on other animals, including livestock outside the park. Practice patience at the roadside watching for wolves at dawn and dusk, and discuss them while watching videos and slides in the classroom at midday.

Bring a scope and tripod if you have them. We will meet in the Lamar Ranch area at 9:00 am on the first day and end at 3:00 pm on the last day.

Ripple Effect: The Ecology of Wolf Restoration

May 22-24 (#511) Limit: 12

Location: Lamar Buffalo Ranch

Instructor: Norman A. Bishop

$180 (Member’s fee $170) New

The restoration of wolves has caused a ripple like a large rock thrown into a small pond and the entire grazer-predator-scavenger food web has felt the effects. At dawn and dusk, we will attempt to observe direct interactions between wolves and other species - wolves chasing elk and bison; face-offs between grizzly bears, coyotes, and wolves; ravens, hawks, and eagles sharing the feast with wolves. In the classroom, we will think together about the interrelationships using illustrated talks and videos. There will be time each afternoon to nap, explore, hike, or read, in preparation for another wolf watching adventure.
We will meet in the Lamar Ranch area at 9:00 am on the first day and end at 3:00 pm late afternoon on the last day.


Wolf Recovery in the Northern Rockies
May 30-31 (#517) Limit: 12
Location: Lamar Buffalo Ranch
Instructor: David Gaillard, M.E.S.
$125 (Member’s fee $115) New

The Yellowstone wolf recovery program generated more public comments than any other natural resource issue in U.S. history. Is it the conservation success-story of the century, or has it brought problems that will only worsen in years to come? What have been the effects of wolf recovery for both people and wolves? Have predictions about effects on the economy and ecology come true? What do we do now that wolves are nearing recovery goals? How many wolves are enough, and where? Join us for a "crash course" on wolf policy in Yellowstone and across the northern Rockies. The format will be presentations and discussions, including plenty of time for observing wolves and other wildlife in Yellowstone.
We will meet in the Lamar Ranch area at 7:00 am on the first day and end late afternoon on the second day.

Wolves—Reality & Myth

May 31-June 2 (#518) Limit: 12

June 20-22 (#618) Limit: 12

Location: Lamar Buffalo Ranch

Instructor: Nathan Varley, M.S.

$125 (Member’s fee $115)

The mythological wolf has guided the human spirit through the ages. Today, in the process of pursuing the Yellowstone wolves, visitors have discovered much about these animals and themselves. Join us in a search for wolves and learn more about our relationship to these controversial carnivores. Immerse yourself in the ecological, cultural, and spiritual realm of the wolf through observations, presentations, and discussions. Plan on being in the field for sunrise and sunset each day. Be prepared for moderately strenuous hikes in the morning or afternoon. In addition to presentations each evening, there will be time for rest and quiet contemplation.

We will meet in the Lamar Ranch area at 7:00 pm on the first day and end at 3:00 pm on the last day.

Mammals Great & Small

June 8-11 (#604) Limit: 12

Location: Lamar Buffalo Ranch

Credit pending: U, 2 semester hours, CSU

Instructor: Don Streubel, D.A.

$235 (Member’s fee $225)

The ecological role of mammals in the Yellowstone ecosystem is the focus of this course. We will study large and small mammal behavior, factors affecting their distribution and abundance, and their management in different parts of the park. Fieldwork and early morning and evening observations of elk, bison, bears, bighorn sheep, pronghorns, ground squirrels, pikas, and possibly wolves will be emphasized. No specific biological background is required, but enthusiasm and a desire to enjoy long hours in the field with animals are a prerequisite. Be prepared for moderate, but not strenuous hiking.

We will meet in the Lamar Ranch area at 8:30 am on the first day and end late afternoon on the last day.

Introduction to Wolf Watching

June 16 (#611) Limit: 13

Location: Lamar Buffalo Ranch

Instructor: Nathan Varley, M.S.

$65 (Member’s fee $55) New

Discover the excitement of wolf watching in Yellowstone! Packed with information, the course will begin with classroom presentations on the momentous history of wolf recovery, recent scientific research discoveries, and the contentious management of these controversial predators. Midway through the afternoon, we will go outside for short, moderately strenuous hikes to ecologically or historically significant locations. After a dinner break, the evening excursion will provide a good opportunity to locate and watch wolves and other wildlife.

We will meet at 1:00 pm in the Lamar Ranch area and end at approximately 10:00 pm.

The Evolution, Ecology & Future of the Wolf Family

June 17-19 (#613) Limit: 12

Location: Lamar Buffalo Ranch

Credit pending: U, 1 semester hour, MSU

Instructors: Elaine Anderson, Ph.D., & James Halfpenny, Ph.D.

$220 (Member’s fee $210)

Dire, gray, red, and timber wolves, coyotes, and foxes: these canids have all roamed North America. Some still survive here in spite of their human cohabitants. How did they evolve and where do they fit in the overall scheme of things? Where does the domestic dog fit in? What is the modern ecology of North American wolves? How do we study these animals in the field? What is happening with the dynamic Yellowstone wolf reintroduction? Will wolves survive the steadily increasing human population? Join Elaine, carnivore paleontologist, and Jim, carnivore ecologist, to answer these and more questions.

Optional sunrise and evening field trips emphasizing wolf observation and reintroduction into Yellowstone will supplement morning and afternoon lectures.

We will meet in the Lamar Ranch area at 9:00 am on the first day and end about 5:00 pm on the last day. Fee includes $20 for course materials.

Predator-Prey Systems

June 19-21 (#615) Limit: 12

Location: Lamar Buffalo Ranch

Credit Pending

Instructor: Mark S. Boyce, Ph.D.

$180 (Member’s fee $170) New

Immerse yourself in the principles of predator-prey dynamics as we examine the effects of keystone predators (especially wolves and bears) on ungulate prey populations. We will use computer models to explore the dynamics of predator-prey systems in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem and we will have early-morning field trips looking for wolves and grizzly bears. Lectures will provide an overview of current research programs on predator-prey systems in the Greater Yellowstone area.

We will meet in the Lamar Ranch area at 9:00 am on the first day and end at 4:00 pm on the last day. If available, students are encouraged (but not required) to bring PC-based laptop computers.

Wolves—Reality & Myth

June 20-22 (#618) (see description above)

Wolves of the World

June 29-July 1 (#635) Limit: 12

Location: Lamar Buffalo Ranch

Instructors: Douglas Smith, Ph.D. & Christine Smith

$200 (Member’s fee $190)

Join us for a comprehensive and intensive study of wolves. Through a combination of classroom sessions and field trips to watch wolves, we will examine their habitat and acclimation pens. You will learn about wolves of the world, North America, and Yellowstone National Park. Topics and issues include: population status worldwide, taxonomy, predator-prey relationships, relationships with other carnivores, morphology, and evolution. A discussion of human/livestock/wolf relations will also be conducted.

There will be required reading before the class begins as well as during the session. Slide shows and videos will be used in the classroom. Participants should be able to hike 2 to 3 miles.

We will meet in the Lamar Ranch area at 9:00 am on the first day and end late afternoon on the last day.

Wolf Watching in Yellowstone
July 2-4 (#706) Limit: 12
Location: Lamar Buffalo Ranch
Instructor: Norman A. Bishop
$180 (Member’s fee $170)

Yellowstone National Park may be the best place in the world to watch wolves. Bring your binoculars, scope and tripod if you have them (Institute has scopes), warm clothing for freezing mornings, and join the crowd. In this course, we will consider the scientific and social reasons why some Americans have alternately reviled and revered wolves. We'll also examine the process of justifying the wolf’s restoration as an experimental population under the Endangered Species Act. Find out what the wolves eat, how they kill their prey, which does the killing, and what effect the wolves have on other animals, including livestock outside the park. We’ll watch for wolves from the roadside at dawn and dusk, and discuss them while watching videos and slides in the classroom at midday.
We will meet in the Lamar Ranch area at 9:00 am on the first day and end at 3:00 pm on the last day.

 

History of Yellowstone Wildlife, 1806-1883

August 7-9 (#809) Limit: 12

Location: Lamar Buffalo Ranch

Credit Pending

Instructor: Lee Whittlesey, J.D.

$125 (Member’s fee $115) New

What species of wildlife were present in Yellowstone before European settlement and how common were these species? How has subsequent settlement and development changed wildlife populations in the park? Some authors have argued that large mammals were not present in the park before the 19th century and that current animal populations were pushed here by encroaching civilization. Under this scenario, current conditions are unnatural, and action should be taken to drastically reduce some wildlife populations including elk and bison herds. But are present wildlife populations really unnatural? This course uses historic accounts from people who visited the park between 1806 and 1882 to address the question. Students will examine numerous documents indicating the presence and prevalence of different wildlife species in the park including elk, bison, wolves, and grizzly bears. Documents to be examined include government survey reports, journals of explorers, trappers, prospectors, military parties, and tourists, early maps, popular books and periodical articles, historic photographs, and contemporary newspaper reports. The course also examines historic populations of threatened or endangered species such as the lynx to help us set realistic recovery goals.

We will meet in the Lamar Ranch area at 1:00 pm on the first day and end mid-afternoon on the last day.

 

Autumn Wolf Watching

October 11-15 (#1001) Limit: 13

Location: Northern Range/Slough Creek Campground

Instructor: Nathan Varley, M.S.

$235 (Member’s fee $225) New

Yellowstone is home to perhaps the world’s most observable wild wolves. These fascinating predators will be the focus for this all-outdoor, natural history curriculum. The course is for the adamant wolf-lover and outdoor enthusiast. Hikes to find lesser-known packs will be sandwiched between early morning and late evening road-based searches. Evenings will be spent around the campfire enjoying presentations by guest experts. Autumn offers quiet, scenic views and nice weather, though students must be prepared for cold mornings and evenings. Students should be prepared to camp and complete strenuous off-trail hikes in sometimes rugged terrain.

We will meet at Slough Creek campground at 4:00 pm on the first day and end at noon on the last day.

Making arrangements for any Yellowstone Association Institute program can be done by contacting the registrar at the address below.  Reservations will be confirmed in writing.  All participants are required to sign a Release and Assumption of Risk form.

Yellowstone Association Institute

P.O. Box 117

Yellowstone National Park

Wyoming 82190

Phone: (307) 344-2294

Fax: (307) 344-2485

astrattman@yellowstoneassociation.org

  

Yellowstone Wolf Tracker

Contents

What's New?

Wolf Courses

Visit Yellowstone

Yellowstone Wolf Packs

Gallery

Links

Educational Materials

About Us

 

 

 

 

Dates Course Title and Price Course Description
May

20-22

Wolf Watching in Yellowstone: 506

Limit: 13 Location: Lamar Buffalo Ranch

Instructor: Norman A. Bishop

$170 (Member  $160)

We will meet in the Lamar Ranch area at 9:00 am on the first day and end at 3:00 PM on the last day. Yellowstone National Park may be the best place in the world to watch wolves. Bring your binoculars, scope and tripod, warm clothing for freezing mornings, and join the crowd. We'll consider the scientific and social reasons why some Americans have alternately reviled and revered wolves. We'll also think through the process of justifying their restoration as an experimental population under the Endangered Species Act. Find out what the wolves eat, how they kill their prey, which does the killing, and what effect wolves have on other animals, including livestock outside the park. Practice patience at the roadside watching for wolves at dawn and dusk, and discuss them while watching videos and slides in the classroom at midday.
May

20-22

The Wolf’s Return—Mythology to Recovery: 507

Limit: 13 Location: Lamar Buffalo Ranch

Instructors: Brian Peck & David Gaillard, M.E.S.

$195 (Member $185)

The saga of the wolf's return continues. This year there should be 10 to 12 packs in Greater Yellowstone, and we'll be there to observe them. This field-oriented class will include expert presentations, storytelling, and daily field trips to explore the wolf's near-demise, and triumphant return. Be prepared to hike 3 to 5 miles to look for North America's dominant predator as it interacts with elk, bison, and bears in the world's first national park. Extensive handouts will be provided. Join us for a howling good time as we welcome home the wolves of Yellowstone. We will meet in the Lamar Ranch area at 7:00 am on the first day and end late afternoon on the last day. Fee includes $15 for course materials.
June

1-3

Wolves—Reality & Myth: 602

Limit: 13  Location: Lamar Buffalo Ranch


Instructor: Nathan Varley, M.S.


$135 (Member $125)

The mythological wolf has guided the human spirit through the ages. Today, in the process of pursuing the Yellowstone wolves, visitors have discovered much about these animals and themselves. Join us in a search for wolves and learn more about our relationship to these controversial carnivores. Immerse yourself in the ecological, cultural, and spiritual realm of the wolf through observations, presentations, and discussions. Plan on being in the field for sunrise and sunset each day. Be prepared for moderately strenuous hikes in the morning or afternoon. In addition to presentations each evening, there will be time for rest and quiet contemplation. We will meet in the Lamar Ranch area at 7:00 PM on the first day and end at 3:00 PM on the last day. Fee includes $10 for course materials.
June

18-20

The Evolution, Ecology & Future of the Wolf Family: 615

Limit: 13 Location: Lamar Buffalo Ranch
Credit pending: U, 1 semester hour, MSU, U of MT, CSU

Instructors: Elaine Anderson, Ph.D., & James Halfpenny, Ph.D.


$200 (Member  $190)

Dire, gray, red, and timber wolves, coyotes, and foxes: these canids have all roamed North America. Some still survive here in spite of their human cohabitants. How did they evolve and where do they fit in the overall scheme of things? Where does the domestic dog fit in? What is the modern ecology of North American wolves? How do we study these animals in the field? What is happening with the dynamic Yellowstone wolf reintroduction? Will wolves survive the steadily increasing human population? Join Elaine, carnivore paleontologist, and Jim, carnivore ecologist, to answer these and more questions. Optional sunrise and evening field trips emphasizing wolf observation and reintroduction into Yellowstone will supplement morning and afternoon lectures. We will meet in the Lamar Ranch area at 9:00 am on the first day and end about 5:00 PM on the last day. Fee includes $20 for course materials.
June

21-23

Wolves—Reality & Myth: 618

Limit: 13 Location: Lamar Buffalo Ranch

Instructor: Nathan Varley, M.S.

$135 (Member $125)
  

The mythological wolf has guided the human spirit through the ages. Today, in the process of pursuing the Yellowstone wolves, visitors have discovered much about these animals and themselves. Join us in a search for wolves and learn more about our relationship to these controversial carnivores. Immerse yourself in the ecological, cultural, and spiritual realm of the wolf through observations, presentations, and discussions. Plan on being in the field for sunrise and sunset each day. Be prepared for moderately strenuous hikes in the morning or afternoon. In addition to presentations each evening, there will be time for rest and quiet contemplation. We will meet in the Lamar Ranch area at 7:00 PM on the first day and end at 3:00 PM on the last day. Fee includes $10 for course materials.
June

27-29

Family Days in the Lamar—The Wolves Come Home: 627

Limit: 20 Location: Lamar Valley I

instructors: Sandra Nykerk & Jim Garry, M.S.

Adult-$180 (Member $170)
Child-$100 (Member $90)

Join us in the Lamar Valley for an exploration of the ecology of this unique and spectacular area, often referred to as “America’s Serengeti.” We’ll focus on the role of predators including the cultural and biological events leading to the removal and return of the gray wolf to Yellowstone National Park. In the classroom, we will investigate the biology of the wolf and the cultural and political context surrounding this controversial species. Guest speakers, daily field observation, and group hikes will supplement classroom activities. We'll be up early and in the field until dark in our pursuit of the Lamar wolves, so we’ll take a midday break. All activities will be paced for families and the final itinerary will be based on the ages and abilities of class participants. We will meet at 9:00 am on the first day and end at 4:00 PM on the last day. Children must be at least 9 years of age. Families who camp must secure their own campsites early in the day or make reservations through Yellowstone National Park Lodges at 307-344-7311. Participants must provide their own equipment and food, including field lunches. Participants will caravan for field trips.
June

30-

July 2

Wolves of the World: 633

Limit: 13 Location: Lamar Buffalo Ranch

Instructors: Douglas Smith, Ph.D. & Christine Smith

$180 (Member  $170)

Join us for a comprehensive and intensive study of wolves. Through a combination of classroom sessions and field trips to watch wolves, we will examine their habitat and acclimation pens. You will learn about wolves of the world, North America, and Yellowstone National Park. Topics and issues include: population status worldwide, taxonomy, predator-prey relationships, relationships with other carnivores, morphology, and evolution. A discussion of human/livestock/wolf relations will also be conducted.There will be required reading before the class begins as well as during the session. Slide shows and videos will be used in the classroom. Participants should be able to hike 2 to 3 miles. We will meet in the Lamar Ranch area at 9:00 a.m. on the first day and end late afternoon on the last day.
July

3-5

Wolf Watching in Yellowstone: 702

Limit: 13 Location: Lamar Buffalo Ranch

Instructor: Norman A. Bishop

$170 (Member $160)

Yellowstone National Park may be the best place in the world to watch wolves. Bring your binoculars, scope and tripod, warm clothing for freezing mornings, and join the crowd. In this course, we will consider the scientific and social reasons why some Americans have alternately reviled and revered wolves. We'll also examine the process of justifying the wolf’s restoration as an experimental population under the Endangered Species Act. Find out what the wolves eat, how they kill their prey, which does the killing, and what effect the wolves have on other animals, including livestock outside the park. We’ll watch for wolves from the roadside at dawn and dusk, and discuss them while watching videos and slides in the classroom at midday. We will meet in the Lamar Ranch area at 9:00 am on the first day and end at 3:00 PM on the last day.
August

12-17

Horsepacking: Mirror Plateau’s Druid Pack: 814

Limit: 8 Location: Lamar Valley

Instructors: Mike & Erin Thompson, Wilderness Pack Trips, Inc.

$1,495 (Member  $1,485)

Late each summer, wolves from Yellowstone’s famous Druid pack leave the valley floor and head for the high country of the Mirror Plateau, where they find abundant food for their new pups. We will travel through this country with wolf expert Dr. Mark Johnson, D.V.M., who was the attending physician during the capture and transport of the wolves from Canada to Yellowstone. Dr. Johnson will share his knowledge of the park’s wolves during day rides into prime wolf habitat. If wešre lucky, we might even see the wolves or have an opportunity to make casts of their tracks. Wilderness Pack Trips, Inc. is a top-quality business that consistently receives the highest ratings from the National Park Service. This trip includes interpretive activities, all group equipment, and five-course meals prepared by the outfitter. We will meet at the Lamar River trailhead at 9:00 am on the first day and return to the same trailhead around 3:00 PM on the last day. Please see general horsepacking information.
Sept

1-4
 

Beartooth Mountain Llama Trek: 901

Limit: 10 Location: Beartooth Wilderness

Instructor: Nathan Varley, M.S.


$595 (Member $585)

Explore the high country of the majestic Beartooth Mountains in the style of the Incas with an expert llama packer and string of experienced pack animals. Thousands of years ago the Incas bred llamas to pack high in the Andes of South America. Whereas camels are known as “ships of the desert,” their llama cousins are known as “ships of the mountains.” Learn about llamas, their history and relationship to humans as they support our expedition. Once on the Beartooth Plateau, we will focus on the ecology of the alpine ecosystem, and the geology, climate, vegetation and wildlife that are found in this enchanting but extreme realm. This course is for the hardy backcountry traveler. Hikes through rugged mountain terrain are strenuous and include climbs of over 6 miles and 2,000 feet elevation gain/ loss. The llamas will transport all food, group gear, and 20 pounds of personal gear per person. Each person must provide their own sleeping bag, pad, eating utensils, clothes, and backpack. Fee includes group equipment (tent, stoves, fuels, etc.), food, llama packing, and food preparation by the staff. We will meet in the Beartooth Wilderness at 8:00 am on the first day and end at 4:00 PM on the last day.
Feb

22-24

2002

Wolf Watching in Yellowstone: 203

Limit: 13 Location: Lamar Buffalo Ranch

Instructor: Norman A. Bishop

$170 (Member  $160)

Yellowstone National Park may be the best place in the world to watch wolves. Bring your binoculars, scope and tripod, warm clothing for subzero mornings, and join the crowd. We will consider the scientific and social reasons why some Americans have alternately reviled and revered wolves, and examine the process of justifying wolf restoration as an experimental population under the Endangered Species Act. Find out what the wolves eat, how they kill their prey, which does the killing, and what effect the wolves have on other animals, including livestock outside the park. We will watch for wolves at dawn and dusk from the roadside, and discuss them while watching videos and slides in the classroom at midday. Depending upon conditions and the wishes of participants, we may ski in wolf country and look for tracks. Cross-country skis and basic outdoor clothing required. Gaiters are a big help. We will meet in the Lamar Ranch area at 9:00 am on the first day and end at 3:00 PM on the last day.
March

15-17

2002

Yellowstone's Wolves: 302

Limit: 13 Location: Lamar Buffalo Ranch

Instructor: James Halfpenny, Ph.D.

$150 (Member $140)

Listen closely -- wolves howl in the Lamar Valley as they travel their established territories preying on elk and raising their pups. Join us for the latest news of the wolf reintroduction and an overview of wolf ecology. Lectures will cover basic taxonomy, biology, ecology, and management. Field sessions will cover identifying wolf tracks (versus dog, fox, and coyote), understanding wolf gaits, reading stories in their trails, and interpreting wolf ecology in the field. With luck we may explore a kill site. Early mornings at sunrise and evenings (optional), we’ll try to view wolves from the road. On Friday and Saturday, there will be evening lectures. We will meet in the Lamar Ranch area at 6:00 PM on the first day for an informal potluck supper followed by a lecture at 7:30 PM, and we will end about 4:00 PM on the last day. Bring field lunches and lots of trail food. Fee includes $15 for course materials.